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Griechische Nachnamen

Sonne-2012

Top-Poster
Von der Endung der Nachnamen kann man meistens die Herkunft der Griechen ableiten

Greece and Cyprus
Main article: Greeks#Surnames

Greek surnames are most commonly patronymics. Occupation, characteristic, or ethnic background and location/origin-based surnames names also occur; they are sometimes supplemented by nicknames.

Commonly, Greek male surnames end in -s, which is the common ending for Greek masculine proper nouns in the nominative case. Exceptionally, some end in -ou, indicating the genitive case of this proper noun for patronymic reasons.

Although surnames are static today, dynamic and changing patronym usage survives in middle names in Greece where the genitive of the father's first name is commonly the middle name.

Because of their codification in the Modern Greek state, surnames have Katharevousa forms even though Katharevousa is no longer the official standard. Thus, the Ancient Greek name Eleutherios forms the Modern Greek proper name Lefteris, and former vernacular practice (prefixing the surname to the proper name) was to call John Eleutherios Leftero-giannis.

Modern practice is to call the same person Giannis Eleftheriou: the proper name is vernacular (and not Ioannis), but the surname is an archaic genitive. However, children are almost always baptised with the archaic form of the name so in official matters the child will be referred to as Ioannis Eleftheriou and not Giannis Eleftheriou.

Female surnames are most often in the Katharevousa genitive case of a male name. This is an innovation of the Modern Greek state; Byzantine practice was to form a feminine counterpart of the male surname (e.g. masculine Palaiologos, Byzantine feminine Palaiologina, Modern feminine Palaiologou).

In the past, women would change their surname when married to that of their husband (again in genitive case) signifying the transfer of "dependence" from the father to the husband. In earlier Modern Greek society, women were named with -aina as a feminine suffix on the husband's first name: "Giorgaina", "Mrs George", "Wife of George". Nowadays, a woman's legal surname does not change upon marriage, though she can use the husband's surname socially. Children usually receive the paternal surname, though in rare cases, if the bride and groom have agreed before the marriage, the children can receive the maternal surname.

Some surnames are prefixed with Papa-, indicating ancestry from a priest, e.g. Papageorgiou, the "son of a priest named George". Others, like Archi- and Mastro- signify "boss" and "tradesman" respectively.

Prefixes such as Konto-, Makro-, and Chondro- describe body characteristics, such as "short", "tall/long" and "fat". Gero- and Palaio- signify "old" or "wise".

Other prefixes include Hadji- (Χαντζή- or Χαντζι-) which was an honorific deriving from the Arabic Hadj or pilgrimage, and indicate that the person had made a pilgrimage (in the case of Christians, to Jerusalem) and Kara- which is attributed to the Turkish word for "black" deriving from the Ottoman Empire era. The Turkish suffix -oglou (derived from a patronym, -oğlu in Turkish) can also be found. Although they are of course more common among Greece's Muslim minority, they still can be found among the Christian majority, often Greeks who were pressured to leave Turkey after the Turkish Republic was founded (since Turkish surnames only date to the founding of the Republic, when Atatürk made them compulsory).

Arvanitic surnames also exist; an example is Tzanavaras or Tzavaras, from the Arvanitic word çanavar or çavar meaning "brave" (pallikari in Greek).[27]

Most Greek patronymic suffixes are diminutives, which vary by region. The most common Hellenic patronymic suffixes are:
-poulos/-poulou, which has a Latin origin (pullus) and means "the little", representing "the son of ...", so if a man's family name is "Christopoulos", it means that his father was named "Christos". This suffix is very widespread throughout Greece and is originally from the Peloponessus in particular.
-idis/iadis/antis used in the Pontus and Asia Minor regions, e.g. Michailidis, the "clan of Michael"
-akis/-aki is associated primarily with Crete and the Aegean Islands. It is a patronymic signifying "little" and/or "son"; therefore Theodorakis is "little Theodore".

Others, less common, are:
-atos/-atou (from Cephallonia and other Ionian Islands)
-as/-a/-ekas/kas (from Epirus)
-ellis/-elli (from Lesvos Island)
-eas/akos/oggonas (from Mani)
-oglou (from the Turkish suffix for "child of" used by both genders)
-ou (genitive, from Cyprus)
-ou/ides/kos (from Macedonia)
-ekas/las (from Epirus)

The suffix -idis (often transliterated -ides in English and French) is the oldest in use. Zeus, for example, was also referred to as Cronides ("son of Cronus").

Either the surname or the given name may come first in different contexts; in newspapers and in informal uses, the order is given name + surname, while in official documents and forums (tax forms, registrations, military service, school forms), the surname is often listed or said first.
Family name - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Meiner endet auf -idis

In der Türkei endete unser Nachname auf -oglou
 

Afro

"Μην τα βά&#950
Von der Endung der Nachnamen kann man meistens die Herkunft der Griechen ableiten

Greece and Cyprus
Main article: Greeks#Surnames

Greek surnames are most commonly patronymics. Occupation, characteristic, or ethnic background and location/origin-based surnames names also occur; they are sometimes supplemented by nicknames.

Commonly, Greek male surnames end in -s, which is the common ending for Greek masculine proper nouns in the nominative case. Exceptionally, some end in -ou, indicating the genitive case of this proper noun for patronymic reasons.

Although surnames are static today, dynamic and changing patronym usage survives in middle names in Greece where the genitive of the father's first name is commonly the middle name.

Because of their codification in the Modern Greek state, surnames have Katharevousa forms even though Katharevousa is no longer the official standard. Thus, the Ancient Greek name Eleutherios forms the Modern Greek proper name Lefteris, and former vernacular practice (prefixing the surname to the proper name) was to call John Eleutherios Leftero-giannis.

Modern practice is to call the same person Giannis Eleftheriou: the proper name is vernacular (and not Ioannis), but the surname is an archaic genitive. However, children are almost always baptised with the archaic form of the name so in official matters the child will be referred to as Ioannis Eleftheriou and not Giannis Eleftheriou.

Female surnames are most often in the Katharevousa genitive case of a male name. This is an innovation of the Modern Greek state; Byzantine practice was to form a feminine counterpart of the male surname (e.g. masculine Palaiologos, Byzantine feminine Palaiologina, Modern feminine Palaiologou).

In the past, women would change their surname when married to that of their husband (again in genitive case) signifying the transfer of "dependence" from the father to the husband. In earlier Modern Greek society, women were named with -aina as a feminine suffix on the husband's first name: "Giorgaina", "Mrs George", "Wife of George". Nowadays, a woman's legal surname does not change upon marriage, though she can use the husband's surname socially. Children usually receive the paternal surname, though in rare cases, if the bride and groom have agreed before the marriage, the children can receive the maternal surname.

Some surnames are prefixed with Papa-, indicating ancestry from a priest, e.g. Papageorgiou, the "son of a priest named George". Others, like Archi- and Mastro- signify "boss" and "tradesman" respectively.

Prefixes such as Konto-, Makro-, and Chondro- describe body characteristics, such as "short", "tall/long" and "fat". Gero- and Palaio- signify "old" or "wise".

Other prefixes include Hadji- (Χαντζή- or Χαντζι-) which was an honorific deriving from the Arabic Hadj or pilgrimage, and indicate that the person had made a pilgrimage (in the case of Christians, to Jerusalem) and Kara- which is attributed to the Turkish word for "black" deriving from the Ottoman Empire era. The Turkish suffix -oglou (derived from a patronym, -oğlu in Turkish) can also be found. Although they are of course more common among Greece's Muslim minority, they still can be found among the Christian majority, often Greeks who were pressured to leave Turkey after the Turkish Republic was founded (since Turkish surnames only date to the founding of the Republic, when Atatürk made them compulsory).

Arvanitic surnames also exist; an example is Tzanavaras or Tzavaras, from the Arvanitic word çanavar or çavar meaning "brave" (pallikari in Greek).[27]

Most Greek patronymic suffixes are diminutives, which vary by region. The most common Hellenic patronymic suffixes are:
-poulos/-poulou, which has a Latin origin (pullus) and means "the little", representing "the son of ...", so if a man's family name is "Christopoulos", it means that his father was named "Christos". This suffix is very widespread throughout Greece and is originally from the Peloponessus in particular.
-idis/iadis/antis used in the Pontus and Asia Minor regions, e.g. Michailidis, the "clan of Michael"
-akis/-aki is associated primarily with Crete and the Aegean Islands. It is a patronymic signifying "little" and/or "son"; therefore Theodorakis is "little Theodore".

Others, less common, are:
-atos/-atou (from Cephallonia and other Ionian Islands)
-as/-a/-ekas/kas (from Epirus)
-ellis/-elli (from Lesvos Island)
-eas/akos/oggonas (from Mani)
-oglou (from the Turkish suffix for "child of" used by both genders)
-ou (genitive, from Cyprus)
-ou/ides/kos (from Macedonia)
-ekas/las (from Epirus)

The suffix -idis (often transliterated -ides in English and French) is the oldest in use. Zeus, for example, was also referred to as Cronides ("son of Cronus").

Either the surname or the given name may come first in different contexts; in newspapers and in informal uses, the order is given name + surname, while in official documents and forums (tax forms, registrations, military service, school forms), the surname is often listed or said first.
Family name - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Meiner endet auf -idis

In der Türkei endete unser Nachname auf -oglou

Meiner endet mit tis
 

H3llas

οἶδα οὐκ &#94
Von der Endung der Nachnamen kann man meistens die Herkunft der Griechen ableiten

Greece and Cyprus
Main article: Greeks#Surnames

Greek surnames are most commonly patronymics. Occupation, characteristic, or ethnic background and location/origin-based surnames names also occur; they are sometimes supplemented by nicknames.

Commonly, Greek male surnames end in -s, which is the common ending for Greek masculine proper nouns in the nominative case. Exceptionally, some end in -ou, indicating the genitive case of this proper noun for patronymic reasons.

Although surnames are static today, dynamic and changing patronym usage survives in middle names in Greece where the genitive of the father's first name is commonly the middle name.

Because of their codification in the Modern Greek state, surnames have Katharevousa forms even though Katharevousa is no longer the official standard. Thus, the Ancient Greek name Eleutherios forms the Modern Greek proper name Lefteris, and former vernacular practice (prefixing the surname to the proper name) was to call John Eleutherios Leftero-giannis.

Modern practice is to call the same person Giannis Eleftheriou: the proper name is vernacular (and not Ioannis), but the surname is an archaic genitive. However, children are almost always baptised with the archaic form of the name so in official matters the child will be referred to as Ioannis Eleftheriou and not Giannis Eleftheriou.

Female surnames are most often in the Katharevousa genitive case of a male name. This is an innovation of the Modern Greek state; Byzantine practice was to form a feminine counterpart of the male surname (e.g. masculine Palaiologos, Byzantine feminine Palaiologina, Modern feminine Palaiologou).

In the past, women would change their surname when married to that of their husband (again in genitive case) signifying the transfer of "dependence" from the father to the husband. In earlier Modern Greek society, women were named with -aina as a feminine suffix on the husband's first name: "Giorgaina", "Mrs George", "Wife of George". Nowadays, a woman's legal surname does not change upon marriage, though she can use the husband's surname socially. Children usually receive the paternal surname, though in rare cases, if the bride and groom have agreed before the marriage, the children can receive the maternal surname.

Some surnames are prefixed with Papa-, indicating ancestry from a priest, e.g. Papageorgiou, the "son of a priest named George". Others, like Archi- and Mastro- signify "boss" and "tradesman" respectively.

Prefixes such as Konto-, Makro-, and Chondro- describe body characteristics, such as "short", "tall/long" and "fat". Gero- and Palaio- signify "old" or "wise".

Other prefixes include Hadji- (Χαντζή- or Χαντζι-) which was an honorific deriving from the Arabic Hadj or pilgrimage, and indicate that the person had made a pilgrimage (in the case of Christians, to Jerusalem) and Kara- which is attributed to the Turkish word for "black" deriving from the Ottoman Empire era. The Turkish suffix -oglou (derived from a patronym, -oğlu in Turkish) can also be found. Although they are of course more common among Greece's Muslim minority, they still can be found among the Christian majority, often Greeks who were pressured to leave Turkey after the Turkish Republic was founded (since Turkish surnames only date to the founding of the Republic, when Atatürk made them compulsory).

Arvanitic surnames also exist; an example is Tzanavaras or Tzavaras, from the Arvanitic word çanavar or çavar meaning "brave" (pallikari in Greek).[27]

Most Greek patronymic suffixes are diminutives, which vary by region. The most common Hellenic patronymic suffixes are:
-poulos/-poulou, which has a Latin origin (pullus) and means "the little", representing "the son of ...", so if a man's family name is "Christopoulos", it means that his father was named "Christos". This suffix is very widespread throughout Greece and is originally from the Peloponessus in particular.
-idis/iadis/antis used in the Pontus and Asia Minor regions, e.g. Michailidis, the "clan of Michael"
-akis/-aki is associated primarily with Crete and the Aegean Islands. It is a patronymic signifying "little" and/or "son"; therefore Theodorakis is "little Theodore".

Others, less common, are:
-atos/-atou (from Cephallonia and other Ionian Islands)
-as/-a/-ekas/kas (from Epirus)
-ellis/-elli (from Lesvos Island)
-eas/akos/oggonas (from Mani)
-oglou (from the Turkish suffix for "child of" used by both genders)
-ou (genitive, from Cyprus)
-ou/ides/kos (from Macedonia)
-ekas/las (from Epirus)

The suffix -idis (often transliterated -ides in English and French) is the oldest in use. Zeus, for example, was also referred to as Cronides ("son of Cronus").

Either the surname or the given name may come first in different contexts; in newspapers and in informal uses, the order is given name + surname, while in official documents and forums (tax forms, registrations, military service, school forms), the surname is often listed or said first.
Family name - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Meiner endet auf -idis

In der Türkei endete unser Nachname auf -oglou

Mikrasiatis ise? :)
 

Sonne-2012

Top-Poster

Pontios aber das gehört eigentlich auch zu kleinasien

Nur wir Griechen unterscheiden zwischen Kleinasien und dem Pontos Gebiet

- - - Aktualisiert - - -

Eine Quelle auf griechisch

ΤΙ ΣΗΜΑΙΝΕΙ ΤΟ ΕΠΩΝΥΜΟ ΣΑΣ; ΔΕΙΤΕ ΑΠΟ ΠΟΥ ΚΑΤΑΓΕΣΤΕ

Όπως ακριβώς τα ονόματα έτσι και τα επώνυμα (ή τα οικογενειακά μας ονόματα αν θέλουμε να χρησιμοποιήσουμε την ορολογία του Μανώλη Τριανταφυλλίδη) όχι μόνο σημαίνουν κάτι, αλλά σε αρκετές περιπτώσεις μπορούν να μας δώσουν στοιχεία για τη γεωγραφική καταγωγή τους, την παλαιότητά, ακόμη και τη γλωσσική τους ιδιαιτερότητα.

Τα περισσότερα ελληνικά επώνυμα προέρχονται συνήθως είτε από τοπωνύμια- όπως Μανιάτης από τη Μάνη, Μωραΐτης από το Μοριά- είτε από διάφορα παρατσούκλια τα οποία ενέπνεαν στους ανθρώπους, αναφέρει η κ. Φούλα Πισπιρίγκου, φιλόλογος, και προσθέτει...
«Από εκεί και πέρα υπάρχουν και μερικές καταλήξεις οι οποίες υποδηλώνουν καταγωγή, όπως για παράδειγμα τα σε ‘ίδης’ και ‘άδης’ που είναι καταλήξεις των Ποντίων, τα σε ‘ογλου’ που είναι Μικρασιατικά και σημαίνουν ο γιος του τάδε, το ‘πουλος’ που απαντάται στην Πελοπόννησο, το «άκος» στη Μάνη και το «άκης» που είναι κρητικό».

Συνοψίζοντας, λοιπόν, μπορούμε να διακρίνουμε τα επώνυμα σύμφωνα με τη σημασία τους σε τέσσερις μεγάλες κατηγορίες, που δηλώνουν αντίστοιχα βαφτιστικό όνομα, καταγωγή, επάγγελμα και παρατσούκλια (ή προσωνύμια).

Πατρωνυμικά
Αυτά που χρησιμοποιούν για ρίζα τους βαφτιστικά ονόματα, είναι μαζί με τα παρατσούκλια το συχνότερο είδος των οικογενειακών ονομάτων. Τα συναντούμε σε ονομαστική πτώση (π.χ. Κωστής, Γεωργής), σε γενική (π.χ. Γεωργίου, Δημητρίου), αλλά και με πολλές καταλήξεις ή υποκοριστικά (π.χ. Στεφανίδης, Αθανασούλας).

Μητρωνυμικά
Αυτά τα οποία βασίζονται στο όνομα της μητέρας, για παράδειγμα Κώστας Ελένης (δηλαδή ο Κώστας της Ελένης). Είναι αρκετά σπάνια και χωρίζονται και αυτά σε κατηγορίες ανάλογα με το επάγγελμα της μητέρας ή του άντρα της (Καλογραίας, Μακαρονούς, Μαμμής, Τσαγκαρίνας), την καταγωγή της μητέρας (Αμουργιανής, Αραπίνης, Βλάχας), ακόμα και το… ελάττωμα της μητέρας (Βουβής, Καμπούρας).

Εθνικά
Είναι τα επώνυμα τα οποία δηλώνουν καταγωγή και φανερώνουν τον τόπο που γεννήθηκε ή έζησε αυτός που έχει το όνομα. Αναφέρονται συνήθως σε χωριά ή ευρύτερες γεωγραφικές περιοχές και οι καταλήξεις τους είναι δεκάδες. Οι πιο συνήθεις είναι οι εξής:

-(ι)ώτης: Τσιριγώτης, Λεπενιώτης, Ανδριώτης, Ηπειρώτης κτλ.
-ίτης: Μπεγλίτης, Πολίτης, Αργυροκαστρίτης κτλ.
-ιανος: Κουταλιανός, Ελεκιστριάνος, Ψαριανός, Σακαρετσιάνος, Χρυσοβιτσιάνος κ.α.
-ινός: Πατρινός, Παργινός, Ζακυνθινός, Καλαβρυτινός
-αίος: Κερκυραίος, Ρωμαναίος κτλ.
http://www.agioritikovima.gr/perizois/23556-ti-imainei-to
 
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